DADA and Bitcoin

Originally published in French on Lundi Matin on Dec. 23rd 2017 here. Translation follows.

Richard Prince takes up Marcel Duchamp’s gesture with a new form of cryptocurrency in place of a urinal.

As Web Neutrality 2.0 beats its last few heartbeats, some artists are having a bit of fun with Web 3.0 and try in this moment to question technological infrastructures and the economic mechanisms behind this “new” web.

Taking sides in a strange situation

Originally published in French by Lundi Matin on Oct. 1st, 2017. Translated from Catalan into French by Alèssi dell’Umbria. Here we present our translation into English. Although we may not agree with a position that advocates for another republic or voting, we share this to deepen the understanding of this present moment in Catalonia. Further reading and listening on this in English can be found here and here.

 

by Santiago López Petit, a Catalonian, a chemist and philosopher. 

There are situations where reality becomes simple. The time has passed to test the veracity or falseness of arguments of those who pretend to defend the Spanish union or proclaim Catalonian independence. It is also no longer necessary to look back at the year 17141, nor to go searching in the more recent discontent. When the call is made for “Law and Order,” all of the sudden, everything becomes clear and each position appears perfectly defined on the field of play. Then, in a visceral fashion, those of us who have remained silent know where to situate ourselves: we will always be those who confront those who would call again for the reestablishment of authority. We know very well a phrase coined in France during the revolution of 1848 that says: Legality kills.

On Direct Democracy

[Originally published on the blog of Léon de Mattis, April 26th, 2017 in French. What follows is a translation into English by ediciones inéditos which has been reviewed by de Mattis himself. We found it has much that could illuminate the way forward as we have seen movements which center calls for Democracy come and go without calling into question this very way of organizing the struggle for total liberation.]

Following an error by the editor, the text entitled Direct Democracy in the book Misery of politics, which appeared this month in éditions Divergences, was not the correct version. The version presented on this blog replaces the version which can be found on pages 59 through 85 of the book.

Onwards (#TowardsTheFall)

[originally published by Lundi matin. translated by ediciones inéditos]

We move not onwards
We will never move onwards ever again
We will never remain ever again
Calm
Face down
We will not complain anymore
We move not onwards
We run towards the tricolor flame extinguishers in hand
We will not stop anymore
Neither at the red
Nor for the words which would say
Calm down

Notes on the police and the banlieues

[Originally published on Carbure, on Feb. 17th, 2017. Translated into English by ediciones inéditos.]

One could say of the police what has been said about the army, that is a much too serious thing to be confided to the police; but we must not forget that capitalism has also allowed the military to wage war as they wished for as long as it has been necessary for capitalism to go to war.

Like any institution, the police enjoy a certain amount of relative autonomy in relation to its internal and external authorities: the State has its own hierarchy. This autonomy exists at all its levels: in the streets, at the police station and at the regional level the police defend their own interests as a corporation and as an institution. As a corporation, it depends on the material and legal means which the State accords it and as an institution, it depends on ideological justification from the State, by what is known as its security doctrine.

“Our neighborhoods are not political deserts”

[Originally published in French by Lundi Matin on Feb. 14th, 2016. Translated into English by ediciones ineditos. Translator’s note: “banlieue” is translated as “suburbs” in this piece but in France, the “banlieues” on the outskirts of Paris carries a connotation closer to “the hood,” often accompanied by xenophobic and racist stereotypes of its racialized residents.]

Interview with Samir of the Suburbs & Immigration Movement (MiB)

Ever since the abuses of the Aulnay-sous-bois police had been made public, the evening riots in the Parisian suburbs have shown no signs of stopping, this despite the calls for calm and threats from the Executive branch. A reader of lundimatin had thus found it pertinent to send us an interview he did with Samir, a militant who came out of the Suburbs & Immigration Movement. Samir talks about his politicization in the suburbs in the ’90s, the riots of November 2005, the role of neighborhood associations and gives us his point of view on the current movement calling for #JusticePourTheo. He offers up a particular analysis on the prolonging of the riot within militant action, including its role within politics and its conjunction with other forms of struggle.

Negrophobia: the fire next time!

Originally published by Olivier Mukuna, a Black Belgian journalist & essayist, on Facebook, Feb. 7th 2017. Translated from the French by ediciones inéditos. [Note: négrophobie*, the original French term, roughly translates to what we denote in English as anti-blackness. The translation will keep use of the the French term, albeit anglicized, because of its power for Black people in the francophone world.]

Sometimes, life will cement together that which you have been trying express for years. Without subtlety. With violence and celerity. For having facilitated three debates on the fight against negrophobia, last weekend at the Bozar of Brussesls1, I did not expect to see Franco-Belgian news supplant to such a degree our exchanges…

Of course, to “encourage” the remarks we made, there had been the white woman Romanie Schotte and her virtual and negrophobic shit, an anencephablic Miss Belgium, understood and protected by most media, with RTL-TVi at the head2 [reference to her racist comment]. There was also the drowning of a Gambian refugee, Pathe Sabally, 22 years old, in the icy waters of Venice accompanied by negrophobic quips from some onlookers.3 The Belgian-on-Belgian “polemic” and the Italian “news headline,” presented as “isolated” and without “known causes” had supported our debate titled, “Struggle Against Afrophobia: or where are we right now in Europe?”4 And in the backdrop there was the hallucinating case of Adama Traoré – or how French authorities strove to protect three police officers who had asphyxiated their victim, let him die on the ground, his hands handcuffed behind his back – where we learned that three autopsies were necessary to establish the causes of death of a young black man 24 years of age… while he was indeed smothered by police.5

Let’s be done with it!

translated from the French. Originally published on Jan. 4th, 2017 by Lundi Matin: https://lundi.am/Qu-on-en-finisse. you can support them here.

2016 comes to an end and along with it some of our hopes. Within the general contempt that the West has for itself, cynicism proclaims itself as a supreme form of political intelligence, and nihilism as the last shade of the political horizon. Language comes apart and words lose their power in a grand power play where nothing but the anguished desire to persist reigns.