Some Pissed Off Los Angeles Anti-Authoritarians

The following is a collectively-written, anonymous statement on the fiasco with the Maoist-turn within Defend Boyle Heights and their antagonism towards las O.V.A.S.1Overthrowing Vendidos, Authority & the State, the Psyco Brigrade & the radical space La Conxa in Boyle Heights, Los Angeles.

First published here: https://mediarevolt.tumblr.com/ Here we re-publish it in solidarity with these projects. Please feel free to re-share & re-publish this statement.


As pro-revolutionists committed to cultivating revolution, many often look to coalitions to do the work of collaboration and moving with the the oppressed towards revolutionary practice. In actuality, when we work together it’s important to not only iron where we agree and have affinity, but where we disagree and where our affinity diverges, where our strategies might actually be counter to one another: i.e. antagonisms. So that we are not surprised in the future, and we don’t flatten struggles for the sake of false unity.

The Rasquache Way

By Noche

Ni de aquí, ni de allá. Neither from here, nor there. An old Chicanx saying that still rings true but tired, with a Chicano-Studies dullness…like Gloria Anzaldúa speaking to us from the other side telling us that the border is a wound, but paraphrasing Cesar Miguel we rather maintain that instead the border is the knife. We also have Corky Gonzales telling us of the great hope of José Vasconcelo‘s raza cósmica for Chicanxs: a hope that is but an inversion of Social Darwinism, infused with anti-blackness & anti-Native erasure and sold as a sort of metaphysical eugenics. It seems we’re in need of some rhetorical updating.

But we have to so we do it real slow…

This is an essay first written in 2015 and published in 2016 for a now-defunct project. Here is an revised version by the original author who now works on this project (which we had shared previously in zine format).

In Los Angeles to be against Capital typically presents itself in a pro-work/worker position. The problem is never work itself, the nature of work or that work is waged but instead what is desired is extending a sphere of work that is unionized and bolstered with higher wages. Take for instance the CLEAN Carwash campaign[1], where carwash workers (whom are mostly immigrant men) have been unionized under the representation of United Steelworkers Local 675.[2] Though this move one is that brings much needed betterment of working conditions and wages for these workers, what is ultimately not brought up is that the work of a car wash workers can and has already been automated. But the fading labor movement seems to be no longer concerned with the overthrow of capitalism nor the abolition of work. That dream is a dream that has been lost along with the labor movement itself.

AUDIO – Contra Aztlán Plática

We are happy to share the audio recorded by Marco Amador at the Contra Aztlán event which took place at La Conxa in Boyle Heights, a space run by Las Ovas on Sept 5th, 2018. The discussion here was frank, open and at times confrontational. Things were said that we did not agree with, but others in the group would interject and point out how so-and-so could be in the wrong, or mistaken. The participants spanned generations and different identities; would switch from English to Spanglish to Spanish; came from different political positions; but we all shared a desire to interrogate what is, not only, Chicano Nationalism but what is Chicanx identity in relation to other oppressed identities. We may help facilitate another event on this same topic in the coming weeks, so if you have any reactions to this audio please keep an eye out for a future event. If you cannot make it you can always send us your responses as a comment on here or email us at ediciones-ineditos@protonmail.com.

In Reference to Who?

As part of our event on September 5th, 2018 at 7PM at the radical autonomous space, La Conxa, an anarchist comrade shares with us her essay on Chicanismo & Chicano Nationalism which offers a necessary feminist critique of these two related ideas. She can be found on twitter at https://twitter.com/xicanarquista and you can help support her & her work by contributing at https://cash.me/$Carlavazquez.

Riot and Representation: The Significance of The Chicano Riot

What follows is an essay we first learned of via our friend El Chavo! His description is an apt introduction to this important essay. The only thing we’ve done is removed the gendered language of some of the essay. Though we may not agree with everything in this essay, we think it stands as a powerful counter-narrative that viewed the Chicano riots of 1970 as merely a police riot. This essay has been pivotal to our own anti-political understanding of the possibilities for revolt and life in Los Angeles:

The following is a hard to find text about the 1970 Chicano riots in East LA, supposedly written by Herbert Marcuse but really written by the Bay Area 1044 situ group of that time. I find these essays on riots quite illuminating in their attempt to understand these periods of intensity as opposed to the typical lefty line of denouncing all violence.. Unfortunately, these views are rare in LA (or the rest of the world for that matter) and most locals subscribe to the line touted by whatever ideology is currently in favor.

The Ditch Party – #FBF

by Noche

So like back in 2016 I wrote a text about anti-work and Chicanxs/Mexicans and I’d like to share this excerpt since talking about 90s ditch parties is now in vogue though they are often spoken of apolitically. Here I attempted to bring it into the realm of antiwork, or maybe it could even be thought of as a kind of refusal to grow-up to just sell their labor-power and a racialized discounted price. Trying to get the fuck out of this world & have a good time, instead of trying to save it.